What is a Biofuel Production Operator?

A Biofuel Production Operator is responsible for the quality of biofuel produced at his or her plant, and the smooth running of production.

What Does a Biofuel Production Operator Do?

We understand the great need for sustainably produced energy sources. The world has made a commitment to limiting the carbon emissions. Couple this with a dwindling supply of fossil fuels and erratic supplies, many countries are expanding biofuel production. Biofuel is not perfect, but it is a form of renewable energy and a solution to some periphery issues such as energy security. In the US, the growth has been immense over the last decade. Biofuel is grown on conventional farms either alongside or in place of food agriculture. Yet this raw biofuel material is not used raw; it must be processed at a relevant centre. Typically, this will be a factory. The factory will either remove the liquid material (such as oil) and discard the solids, or grind it down for refining into a useable product.

It is the role of a Biofuel Production Operator to ensure that the day-to-day production of biofuel runs smoothly. They are in charge of the area of IT responsible for the supply chain, heavy equipment, the production line and other systems. They may be responsible for taking quality control samples and correcting any errors in the system. They may carry out regular inspections and repairs, and submit quality control system to biochemists in labs where necessary.

Where Does a Biofuel Production Operator Work?

A Biofuel Production Operator is a type of Industrial Production Manager, managing processes and systems rather than people. Most people qualified in this this type of role work in metal production (11%) and transportation equipment manufacturing employ around 10%. Most relevant to the biofuel industry, some 8% are employed in chemical manufacturing plants. This is a small and growing area as the amount of biofuel production increases in the coming decades.

8% work at machinery manufacturing and 7% work in food processing and manufacture. A Biofuel Production Operator could conceivably work in any of these areas and at any factory requiring understanding of the concept of quality control. Although possessing skills in diagnostic and repair of heavy equipment and factory machinery, he or she will also have skills relevant directly to the biofuel processing and chemical engineering in general.

What Is the Average Biofuel Production Operator Salary?

According to BLS statistics in 2015 for Industrial Production Management, the median salary for this type of role is presently $93,940. The highest paying area, which should include biofuel manufacturing, stands at $100,830. Consequently, this is the highest paying sector for this type of industrial worker with this type of role. Depending on what is processed, their salary could reflect the food processing salary data. This was lower than the median salary at $86,020 per year.

StateTotal EmploymentBottom 25%Median SalaryTop 75%
Alabama2,690$70,130$89,150$113,530
Alaska60$75,630$87,400$114,510
Arizona2,540$69,280$89,770$119,760
Arkansas1,880$57,160$73,110$94,230
California17,760$74,520$97,730$130,780
Colorado1,170$71,960$94,610$122,810
Connecticut2,970$82,020$102,470$127,360
Delaware350$89,550$107,710$137,320
Florida3,700$78,750$92,430$115,620
Georgia3,970$67,340$85,670$110,580
Hawaii190$48,560$67,630$91,820
Idaho600$54,880$73,650$97,010
Illinois7,440$69,500$87,440$111,370
Indiana7,410$64,130$79,830$101,100
Iowa2,990$62,010$77,850$95,290
Kansas1,740$61,520$77,160$97,600
Kentucky3,570$64,510$80,440$102,700
Louisiana1,830$70,370$94,840$127,290
Maine610$65,130$82,620$99,450
Maryland1,360$79,330$99,480$127,850
Massachusetts3,990$77,410$99,010$126,940
Michigan11,350$80,670$98,060$123,710
Minnesota4,830$71,010$89,020$114,670
Mississippi1,530$64,000$81,030$98,060
Missouri3,180$62,790$83,030$113,270
Montana110$62,960$76,800$114,840
Nebraska950$65,620$79,680$102,050
Nevada690$67,500$88,030$109,870
New Hampshire870$75,990$94,920$116,740
New Jersey4,980$88,050$108,660$139,370
New Mexico470$62,720$84,750$117,360
New York5,000$78,670$100,910$133,070
North Carolina5,020$74,610$92,400$117,960
North Dakota350$62,110$79,560$115,100
Ohio11,780$65,130$83,720$109,310
Oklahoma3,100$63,610$81,400$110,550
Oregon2,420$67,670$86,880$111,080
Pennsylvania6,660$72,150$93,610$123,980
Puerto Rico1,100$64,940$90,530$120,000
Rhode Island410$78,630$93,380$117,490
South Carolina2,790$76,100$95,730$123,330
South Dakota350$71,590$84,690$96,810
Tennessee4,570$63,780$84,390$111,670
Texas11,670$68,280$93,990$129,800
Utah1,740$67,400$89,020$114,380
Vermont340$65,440$88,740$114,750
Virginia2,210$78,710$102,300$139,020
Washington2,610$71,810$95,220$123,190
West Virginia700$67,510$84,830$108,620
Wisconsin5,570$70,020$89,290$114,860
Wyoming260$96,860$112,490$131,270

Table data taken from BLS (http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes113051.htm)

Biofuel Jobs & Job Description

Recent Biofuel Production Job Listings

Use the search box below to find all the biofuel production operator job listings in our job board.

What Is the Job Demand for Biofuel Production Operators?

Demand for all production management jobs is expected to rise just 4% in the period 2014 to 2024. That is half the average of all jobs in the USA. The reason for this expected slow down depends on the country's general manufacturing output and the uncertain nature of the US economy. Also, as technology in biofuel production advances, factories that produce these fuel types are likely to need fewer personnel on site. Expansion of facilities in a growing industrial area could increase employment numbers, but the picture for biofuel is presently unclear.

What Are the Education Requirements to Become a Biofuel Production Operator?

Degrees in this type of role are vital. In production management roles, employers prefer business administration degrees or something along the lines of mechanical or industrial engineering. However, due to the specialist area of this job type, it is vital to have studied degrees relating to environment and chemistry - chemical engineering would be advantageous, as would environmental chemistry as a science. Sustainability may be useful too. Environmental engineering could be advantageous in some cases. High school students should ensure that they have a great background in applied science, particularly in math, physics and chemistry.

Employees with many years of experience are sometimes able to work their way into these positions of responsibility. However, they may be required to take a training course to ensure that they have the relevant specialist knowledge and background to work in biofuel production and processing centers. They will certainly need to enter a form of relevant management and technical training.

Masters degrees are rarely required. Those who enter into postgraduate study in business management, industrial engineering, chemistry and so on are more likely to work in research or academia than on the shop floor, applying their scientific understanding to processing and manufacturing. There is a similar situation with doctoral studies. People with PhDs in chemical engineering are likely to find employment in research labs, developing the next generation of biofuels.

Biofuel Production - Related Degrees

What Kind Of Societies and Professional Organizations Do Biofuel Production Operators Have?

A growing area within heavy manufacturing, the global effort to reduce reliance on fossil fuels means the following groups presently exist.

  • Biomass Power Association: Dedicated to promoting the use of biomass in the USA, they work with plants in 20 states at present, improving standards and working towards greater efficiency. They consult with government on legislation and policy and have an influential membership body
  • Algae Biomass Organization: For those who work in algae production, this organization is there for you to promote and improve algae production for use as an alternative fuel source
  • American Society for Quality: Although not specifically for biofuel, they are involved in quality control all over the world, no matter the industry, for factory work and production